Learn to use the image sensor optics (ISO) settings of your camera or it could work against you. The higher the ISO is on your camera, the more detail you can see, which will cause the quality to appear more grainy. If your shot needs the grain it is fine; if not, it could be devastating.

To experiment with photography, be sure to play around with shutter speeds. A slower speed means the shutter is open longer and can capture motion. Photos of a waterfall with a slow shutter speed would make the water look like one continuous motion. Faster shutter speeds capture action and are frequently used in sports photography. A photo of a waterfall in this example would show every drop of water clearly. It’s important to keep the object of your shot in focus for the best pictures. Having your subject matter in complete focus is a key element to taking fantastic photos which reflect your style and your intentions when shooting. For beginners, your best photos will have the subject in the center and fully in view. The background is independent and responsible for itself. Try to get as close as you can to your photograph subject. The subject of your photograph will take up the bulk of the shot, allowing details to show which can be intriguing. If you are shooting a photo of a plant or an inanimate object, this is a very good technique. If you just can’t get close enough to what you want a picture of, use your camera’s zoom function to make the object closer.

Pay attention to your light. The lighting in a photograph can bring a subject into better focus or change the mood of the picture. Different lighting setups will result in very different photographs. Avoid harsh direct lighting on your subject’s face, as this will generally cause them to squint. One of the things that you can do when you are taking pictures is to lean on something to achieve better balance. The more balance that you have, the less movement the camera will make, which can improve the sharpness of your shots. Maintain your balance if you desire optimal photographs. Most pictures are taken with the camera at or near the subject’s eye level. Common sense says this is good, but get the “WOW” factor by changing the angle from which you shoot. Try shooting down at the subject from higher up or get close to the ground and shoot up.

If possible, avoid using the flash that you find on most cameras nowadays. It tends to give the subject ‘red eye’, and it removes a lot of the shadow that can create depth in a picture. If you have to use a flash, such as an indoor nighttime shot, keep your subject away from walls. This way you won’t end up with an ugly black shadow that resembles an outline.

To avoid red eyes in your photographs, make sure that your camera either has built in red eye reduction or you change the direction of your flash. If you did shoot a photo and it contains red eyes, you can easily remove them through the use of a graphics software such as Corel or Photoshop.

You need to understand how sharpness works when you are framing a shot. Sharpness appears in the center of the picture and the lens most often. Be sure that your edges fade appropriately as the subject edges towards the boundaries of the frame.

Play with the shutter speed setting to get shots of both slow and fast-moving subjects. Slow shutter speeds are great for objects that move very slowly, such as streams. Fast shutter speeds, on the other hand, allow you to get a clear shot of a subject that is moving very quickly, such as a race car. When setting up for a shot, keep in mind that less, often times, is more in photography. Keep things simple, and avoid unnecessary clutter in your shots. There is something special about keeping your photographs simple.

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